The Adelaide Oval history

Go down

The Adelaide Oval history

Post by Admin on Thu Oct 04, 2012 1:09 pm

Chat about the history of the Adelaide oval, tell us your experiences in the past watching football or cricket etc. Include photos over time if you can..
avatar
Admin

Join date : 2011-12-11
Posts : 944

Back to top Go down

Re: The Adelaide Oval history

Post by Chambo Off To Work We Go on Thu Oct 04, 2012 4:18 pm

Here is some Adelaide Oval history that I have been discovering.

In 1871 an act was proclaimed to enable the Corporation of Adelaide to lease a portion of the North Parklands for a Cricket Ground. Would you believe that the Act was only 1 single page! It basically provided for the Council to lease a "convenient portion" of the parklands not exceeding 12 acres for a period of 21 years.

The terms of the lease were basically set out in one 16 line parargraph. Needless to say that many of these terms were fairly general by today's legislative standards. It allowed for grandstands, booths, admission or refusal of persons, horses or other animals (not sure what ticket price a horse was! ) and for the manangement and maintenance of the circket ground.

Moving right along to 1897, it appeared that 12 acres was just too small to run all the cricketing operations necessary and a further 4 acres was appropriated from the parklands. However, this legislation was for the purpose of Cricket and a General Recreation Ground - an interesting side addition that obviously catered to football and other uses including outdoor entertainment. This Act was all of 4 pages, so you can see things had progressed in legal speak in 26 years!

You will be pleased to know the new Act still had provisions under clause 3(b) to "exclude, eject or remove any animals or vehicles, or animals and vehicles (my emphasis) from such leased lands or any portion thereof". I have no idea why this distinction was made between animals and vehicles, however, I guess it must have been important.

The final area of the ground that was surveyed and defined under this Act was 15 Acres, 1 Rood and 38 perches - or 6.268 hectares in today's language.

Ok so we come to 2011 and a new piece of legislation is enacted, "The Adelaide Oval Redevelopment Act". We now have some 21 pages to handle the complex leases, land tenures and interests in the Adelaide Oval precinct.

Essentially the Council as current lessee of the Crown Land section that is Adelaide Oval, must at the request of the Minister, grant a lease to the Minister, over all of the Adelaide Oval Core Area. This Core Area is the section specified in the 1897 Act + the southern car park area + Victor Richardson Rd + an area roughly 20-odd metres east of the current back of the Chappell Stands.

The Greenies will note carefully, that the Minister may not remove or subtantially alter any of the Moreton Bay Fig Trees located within the Core Area, without the approval of the Council (which approval must not unreasonably be withheld).

The Minister is then authorised to grant a sublease to the SMA over any part of the Core Area.

Further licenses are then issued under the SMA sub-lease to SACA and the SANFL in regard to cricket and football uses.

The legislation conveys rights to the Minister for issue of licences over the northern parklands - essentially for carparking, access and other ancillary activities. It also allows for the amendment of land titles to reflect these defined areas.

I wonder just how much public angst occurred in 1897 when the lease was extended compared to 2011? Probably would have barely rated a mention in the newspaper I would wager.

The Designer of the Scoreboard

F. Kenneth Milne was one of South Australia’s most well-known and prolific early to mid twentieth century architects.

Frank Kenneth Milne was born on 18 July 1885 at Tusmore House, Tusmore. He was one of eight children. Milne married Hazel Muir Fotheringham on the 12 March 1913 and was a forthright character. When he died on 3 October 1980, at the age of 96, he was a popular doyen of South Australian architects and still a devotee of the Georgian style.

Milne lived a life of privilege, thanks to the generosity of his relatives who paid for his early education and his articles of apprenticeship as an architect.

Milne attended Glenelg Public School for his primary education and North Adelaide Public School for his secondary schooling. Milne remembered that as a primary school student, he always was drawing houses on his school books, even at that age, so it seemed to that there was nothing he could possibly do in the world but architecture.

Milne began his architectural career when he was articled to the well-known Adelaide architect Alfred Wells from around 1900. One of Milne’s uncles paid Wells £350 for a three year apprenticeship and after 18 months Milne began to receive a wage of £1 per week.

In April 1909 Milne established his own practice in Grenfell Street. It took time for him to build his practice. One of Milne’s earliest commissions was the Hampshire Hotel in Grote Street (1910).

This was followed by his much revered Adelaide Oval Scoreboard (1911). In fact the South Australian Cricket Association became one of his longstanding clients.

Another client was the South Australian Brewing Co. Ltd. Much of Milne’s early work comprised hotels in both metropolitan and rural areas. Over time, he established a reputation for his domestic work and designed many large residences for wealthy members of Adelaide’s establishment; his family’s connections proving invaluable.

Milne designed many significant Adelaide buildings including Lister House on North Terrace (1927), and the Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society building on Waymouth Street (1928). In 1933 he travelled to Britain and Europe for several months where he took a keen interest in Georgian architecture. This influence can be seen in his designs for Sir Alexander Downer’s residence at Aldgate, known as Arbury Park (c.1930s), and his own house, Sunnyside on Stanley Street in North Adelaide (c.1936).

Milne was reluctant to embrace modernism and gradually retired from practice during the period from 1956 to 1962.

Milne’s contribution to architecture was recognised during his lifetime. In 1944 he was awarded the first SAIA Award of Merit for Domestic Architecture. In 1953 he was honoured with her Majesty’s Coronation Medal. In 1970 he was awarded Life Fellow of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects.


Last edited by Chambo Off To Work We Go on Thu Nov 15, 2012 10:03 pm; edited 1 time in total
avatar
Chambo Off To Work We Go

Join date : 2012-02-03
Posts : 2906
My club : sturt

Back to top Go down

Re: The Adelaide Oval history

Post by Chambo Off To Work We Go on Thu Nov 15, 2012 9:26 pm

A (very) brief timeline.

ADELAIDE Oval has been the centrepiece of sport in South Australia for almost 140 years.

1871: Venue established after the formation of the South Australian Cricket Association.

1873: Cricket first played at Adelaide Oval.

1877: Australian football was first played at Adelaide Oval.

1884: In December the first Test is played at the venue between Australia and England.

1890: Historic Moreton Bay fig trees planted.

1900: Competitive cycling is held at the ground - the track was on the edge of the grass and the picket fence separated riders from spectators.

1910: Cycling ceased at Adelaide Oval.

1911: Scoreboard, designed by architect Kenneth Milne, is erected.

1933: The infamous Bodyline Test in January attracted a record crowd of 174,452 to the ground over five days.

1965: The single day's highest attendance is recorded at the SANFL grand final between Port Adelaide and Sturt with 62,543 fans in attendance.

1973: Last SANFL Grand Final played between North Adelaide and Glenelg

1991: NSWRL (rugby league) came to the Adelaide Oval when the St. George Dragons played the Balmain Tigers.

1997: Lights were constructed at the ground, allowing for sport to be played at night.

1997: Adelaide formed its own rugby league side, the Rams, that played at Adelaide Oval as part of the Super League competition.

2006-07: The Ashes Test was also a major event and drew 136,761 enjoying the five days of play.

2007: Adelaide United plays a one-off soccer match against Sydney F.C. at the ground.

In total, 18 sports have been played at the ground.
avatar
Chambo Off To Work We Go

Join date : 2012-02-03
Posts : 2906
My club : sturt

Back to top Go down

Re: The Adelaide Oval history

Post by Adelaide Hawk on Tue Nov 20, 2012 9:15 pm

The one true honour of living in South Australia, or Adelaide in particular, is the knowledge I can take a short trip into the city, a short walk down King William Street, and I can visit the oval generally regarded as the most picturesque cricket ground in the world.

Some special memories for me:

1965-66: Fourth Test v England. The poms on made 241, then Simpson and Lawry put on 244, Lawry making 119 and Simpson 225. An outright win over the Poms, who could ask for more?

My best friend's father worked in the scoreboard and we were allowed up there many times to watch. Great view!!!!

1966: First football game attended (funnily enough) Sturt v North Adelaide, saw a young Sandy Nelson towel up Don Lindner, and the emergence of an SANFL football power in Sturt. Watched the 1966 GF, Norwood winning the Reserves, and Sturt the League.

1967-68: Saw New Zealander Dick Motz belt 94, taking 62 runs from 4 Ian Chappell overs. I've never seen anyone hit the ball as far as Motz did that day, except maybe Gilchrist. Saw Les Favell and John Causby put on 281 partnership v NSW.

1968 GF: Eric Freeman kicked a goal at the Torrens end, I jumped to mark the ball and some gorilla behind me fisted it away .. grrrr!!!! Endersbee's two check side goals a highlight for me.

1970 GF: Slept overnight outside the ground. Beautiful day on Friday but the rain hit about 4am and drowned us out. I was like a drowned rat watching Sturt and Glenelg slog it out on a mud bath. Norwood again won the Ressies!!!

1970-71: Barry Richards showing his amazing ability with the bat.

1971 & 1972 GFs: Barrie Robran in concert.

1973 GF: Best Grand Final in SANFL history. Nothing more needs to be said. Sadly, Grand Finals were played at Football Park from 1974.

1974-75: Watching Rod Marsh standing 30 metres back and taking Jeff Thomson in front of his face with the ball still on the way up!! Most awesome sight in cricket. He was injured playing tennis on the day off, not happy!!

1975-76: Watching Viv Richards make a ton against an awesome Aussie attack, somehow you had the feeling he was going to be someone.

1995-96 Shield final: McIntyre and George hanging on grimly to win SA the shield. It was the first time I saw Adam Gilchrist bat, he made 189 not out and I've never seen a cleaner hitter of the ball.

2006-07: Amazing Adelaide. The incredible Test where England declared at 6/551, and Australia won the match by 6 wickets. Shane Warne superb on the final day bowling the Aussies to an unlikely win. Two of Australia's greatest ever batsmen, Ponting and Clarke both made 100s. This Test will live as the greatest I ever witnessed.

Add to this, the pleasure of watching the batting talents of Ian Chappell, Greg Chappell, David Hookes and Darren Lehmann, always worth the price of admission. I saw Lehmann make 162 in his final innings for SA, what a great player he was.

Also, the numerous rock concerts I attended, both inside and outside of the oval. I recall one balmy evening sitting outside with an esky listening to Fleetwood Mac. Free entertainment and few cold ones thrown in, life doesn't get much better than that.

I'm sure there are many other memories, but they will have to do for the time being. I may be back Smile
avatar
Adelaide Hawk

Join date : 2012-01-31
Posts : 1832
Location : Adelaide
Teams : Norwood, Hawthorn
My club : norwood

Back to top Go down

Re: The Adelaide Oval history

Post by testy on Mon Jan 19, 2015 2:40 pm


If anybody has a spare hour and a half get along and do the Adelaide Oval tour. For $20 (adult) you get a guided tour of the many parts of the oval with many facts and figures thrown in, it really is great value. All of the guides are volunteers.

When going through the scoreboard it bought back many memories I have of the days I worked at the oval as a cleaner. During test matches I would rock up at lunch time and head straight to the scoreboard and watch the rest of the day's play from the top tier, before the revamp of the oval this was the best view of the ground. They were good times and with time comes change and seeing the ground as it is today really is something to be proud of for little old Adelaide.
avatar
testy

Join date : 2012-02-02
Posts : 1432
Location : Dog House
My club : west

Back to top Go down

Re: The Adelaide Oval history

Post by bayman on Mon Jan 19, 2015 7:09 pm

with a different shaped oval we'll never see another goal like Ben Hollands kicked in a state game several years ago.....one of the best goals i've seen
avatar
bayman

Join date : 2012-02-05
Posts : 7181
Location : on a marx brothers set
Teams : plympton, glenelg, redbacks & whoever the money is on
My club : glenelg

Back to top Go down

Re: The Adelaide Oval history

Post by bayman on Tue Jan 17, 2017 3:17 pm

the first night match at the Adelaide oval was played on July 1 1885

Adelaide 1.8

South Adelaide 0.8

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelaide_Football_Club_(SAFA)
avatar
bayman

Join date : 2012-02-05
Posts : 7181
Location : on a marx brothers set
Teams : plympton, glenelg, redbacks & whoever the money is on
My club : glenelg

Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum